Texas Instruments

2012 Corporate Citizenship Report


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Climate change

TI and the semiconductor industry are working proactively to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and are committed to global business sustainability.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's most recent U.S. GHG Inventory Report, the semiconductor industry emitted 0.1 percent of the total U.S. GHG emissions inventory in 2011. While our industry's emissions are relatively small, we make substantial financial investments and employ numerous mitigation strategies to reduce GHG emissions by: These programs help reduce "direct" or scope 1 emissions (owned or controlled by TI) and "indirect" or scope 2 emissions (due to purchased electricity, heat or steam) that contribute to climate change. We have dedicated teams to manage and measure our progress. In addition, we also leverage external expertise, and share our knowledge with government and industry entities to continue to reduce GHG emissions.

Many of our efforts to reduce GHG emissions have been in place for decades. We began a formal energy conservation program in the mid-1970s.

1994
  • Began publicly reporting environmental performance.
1995
  • Joined industry initiative to research technologies to reduce and report U.S. PFC emissions
2000
  • Joined U.S. industry in setting goal to reduce PFCs by 10 percent by 2010 (from a 1995 baseline).
2001
  • Implemented a strategy to reduce PFC emissions, which included integrating abatement and other technology solutions worldwide.
2003
  • Began reporting to Carbon Disclosure Project.
2005
2006
  • Shifted energy use policies to align with our climate-change objectives
2007
  • Reduced global PFC emissions from TI's peak 1999 levels by 48 percent, normalized to production.
  • Implemented 30 energy-conservation projects that saved $2.3 million and prevented 16,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) from entering the atmosphere.
  • Calculated first carbon footprint (including scope 1 and 2 emissions).
  • Formally linked energy conservation program with climate-change strategy.
  • Created three-year plan for additional emission-reduction activities.
2008
  • Implemented 157 energy-conservation projects that saved $5.6 million and prevented 32,000 metric tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.
  • Expanded scope of GHG emissions reporting to all six gases covered by the Kyoto Protocol and added nitrogen trifluoride (NF3).
2009
  • Implemented 80 energy-conservation projects that saved $3.4 million and prevented 21,000 metric tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.
2010
  • Helped the semiconductor industry achieve a 10-year, 10 percent reduction of PFCs from a 1995 baseline.
  • Implemented 103 energy-conservation projects that saved $3.7 million and prevented 28,000 metric tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.
  • Decreased the amount of energy required to design, market and manufacture a semiconductor chip by 24 percent year-on-year.
  • Set a goal to reduce TI's GHG emissions per chip produced by 30 percent by 2015 (from a 2010 baseline).
2011
  • Joined the semiconductor industry in establishing a goal to reduce GHG emissions by 30 percent per area of silicon wafers processed by 2020 (from a 2010 aggregated baseline).
  • Implemented 117 energy-conservation projects that saved $7.1 million and prevented 43,000 metric tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.
  • Sourced 10 percent of the electric power used by our Texas sites from wind energy. Collectively, these activities helped prevent 115,000 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.
2012
  • Implemented 181 energy-conservation projects that saved $5.4 million and prevented 46,000 metric tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.
  • Joined the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Plants program and committed to reduce our U.S. manufacturing energy intensity 25 percent by 2020 (from a 2010 baseline). These reductions will help reduce our scope 2 GHG emissions.