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Jack Kilby with His Engineering Notebook

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Jack Kilby with His Engineering Notebook – Jack recorded the successful demonstration of the first integrated circuit in his engineering notebook. Signed JS Kilby, the page in his notebook is dated September 12, 1958.

Jack Kilby, modern

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Jack Kilby, modern - While working at Texas Instruments, Jack Kilby invented the world's first integrated circuit in 1958, and he was a co-inventor of the world's first electronic handheld calculator in 1967. He is the recipient of two of the nation's most prestigious honors in science and engineering -- the National Medal of Science and a member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

Jack Kilby, 2000

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Jack Kilby, 2000 - Jack Kilby invented the world's first integrated circuit while working at Texas Instruments in 1958. He was awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physics for this invention.

Jack Kilby with Products Using Integrated Circuits

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Jack Kilby with Products Using Integrated Circuits - Jack Kilby's invention of the integrated circuit was the genesis of almost every electronic product used today. From cell phones, to modems, to Internet audio players, the chip has changed the world and enabled an entire industry to grow.

Jack Kilby with Products Using Integrated Circuits

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Jack Kilby with Products Using Integrated Circuits - Jack Kilby's invention of the integrated circuit was the genesis of almost every electronic product used today. From cell phones, to modems, to Internet audio players, the chip has changed the world and enabled an entire industry to grow.

Jack Kilby Holding Chips

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Jack Kilby Holding Chips - Jack Kilby's invention of the integrated circuit began the digital revolution. Today's chips integrate millions of transistors onto a single chip with unprecedented levels of integration, performance and power.

Jack Kilby Examines 300 mm Wafer

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Jack Kilby Examines 300 mm Wafer - Jack Kilby's first integrated circuit contained a single transistor and other components. Tens of thousands of engineers around the world have built on Jack's invention, and the industry has been able to provide smaller, more powerful, cheaper chips with each generation. Many of today’s integrated circuits are manufactured on state-of-the-art 300-millimeter wafers, as the industry continues to offer consumers more powerful chips at lower costs.

Jack Kilby in a Kilby Center Lab

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Jack Kilby in a Kilby Center Lab - Jack Kilby's invention of the integrated circuit was done in an R&D lab far different from the sophisticated process labs of today, where scanning electron microscopes allow engineers to validate their circuits at the microscopic level. This lab is in the Kilby Center, one of the most technologically advanced semiconductor R&D facilities in the world.

Jack Kilby, 1958

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Jack Kilby (circa 1958) - Jack Kilby (circa 1958) photographed shortly after his invention of the first integrated circuit at Texas Instruments.

First Integrated Circuit

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First Integrated Circuit - Jack Kilby invented the integrated circuit at Texas Instruments in 1958. Comprised of only a transistor and other components on a slice of germanium, Kilby's invention, 7/16-by-1/16-inches in size, revolutionized the electronics industry. The roots of almost every electronic device we take for granted today can be traced back to Dallas more than 40 years ago.

First Electronic Handheld Calculator

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First Electronic Handheld Calculator - The electronic hand-held calculator was invented at Texas Instruments in 1967 by Jack Kilby, Jerry Merryman, and James Van Tassel. Measuring 4-1/4 x 6-1/8 x 1-3/4-inches, it was the first mini-calculator to have the high degree of computational power found only at the time in considerably larger machines.

View Inside the First Electronic Handheld Calculator

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View Inside the First Electronic Handheld Calculator - The working heart of the first miniature calculator, invented at Texas Instruments in 1967, was an integrated semiconductor circuit array that contained all the necessary electronics for performing addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.