Automated External Defibrillator

Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) solutions from processors to signal conditioning to power management

Block Diagram

Click on the colored blocks to view or sample recommended solutions


AC/DC Supply

Design Considerations

Automated External Defibrillator

Overview:

Most automated external defibrillators (AED) are highly sophisticated embedded processor-based devices that monitor, assess and automatically treat patients with life-threatening heart rhythms. They capture ECG signals from the electrodes, runs an ECG-analysis algorithm to identify shockable rhythms, and advises the operator about whether defibrillation is necessary. A basic defibrillator contains a high-voltage power supply, storage capacitor, optional inductor and patient electrodes. It develops an electrical charge in the storage capacitor, creating the potential for current flow. The higher the voltage, the more current can potentially flow. The AED outputs audio instructions and visual prompts. In a typical defibrillation sequence, the AED provides voice prompts to instruct the user to attach the patient electrodes and starts acquiring ECG data. If the AED analyzes the patient’s ECG and detects a shockable rhythm, the capacitor is charged, Where Wc = 1/2CV^2c; and capacitor voltage, Vc(t) = Vc(0)e–t/RC, where R = R(lead) << R(chest). When the shock button is pressed to deliver the high-voltage pulse; current begins flowing through the body to depolarize most of the heart cells, to re-establish coordinated contractions and normal rhythm. The amount of flowing current is determined by the capacitor and body impedance. Many jurisdictions require that the AED record the audio from the scene of a cardiac arrest for post-event analysis. All AEDs include a means to store and retrieve patient ECG patterns. The front-end signals of the AED come from the ECG electrodes placed on the patient, which requires an instrumentation amplifier to amplify its very small amplitude (<10mV). Targeted instrumentation amplifiers would be designed to have:

  • Capability to sense low-amplitude signals from 0.1mV to 10mV
  • Very high input impedance (>5MO)
  • Very low input leakage current (<1µA)
  • Flat frequency response of 0.1Hz to 100Hz
  • High common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) (>100dB)

Another input of the AED is the microphone for recording the audio from the scene. Both ECG and microphone inputs are digitized and processed by a DSP. Most AED designs use a 16-bit processor and therefore work well with 16-bit ADCs to digitize ECG and voice input. The amplified ECG signal has a bandwidth of 0.1Hz to 100Hz and requires a minimum SNR of 50dB. The audio recording/playback signal typically has a bandwidth of 8kHz and requires a minimum SNR of 65dB. The microphone input also needs to be amplified with a maximum programmable gain of 40dB. The AED can have synthesized audio instruction with volume control output to either the headphone speaker or the 8Ω speaker. The TLV320AIC20 makes the front-end digitization very simple because it integrates two ADCs, two DACs, a microphone amplifier, a headphone driver and an 8Ω driver with volume control; and it can be gluelessly interfaced to a DSP.

Application Notes (3)

Title Abstract Type Size (KB) Date Views
HTM 8 KB 06 Sep 2011 332
HTM 9 KB 21 Sep 2009 1634
HTM 8 KB 19 Aug 2008 1631
    

Reference Designs

Description Part Number Company Tool Type
CC2430 Anaren Balun Reference Design CC2430BALUN_REFDES Texas Instruments Reference Designs
CC2430-CC2591EM Reference Design CC2430-CC2591EM_RD Texas Instruments Reference Designs
CC2430DB Reference Design CC2430DB_REFDES Texas Instruments Reference Designs
CC2430EM Discrete Reference Design CC2430EM_DISCRETE_REFDES Texas Instruments Reference Designs
CC2430EM Reference Design CC2430EM_REFDES Texas Instruments Reference Designs
CC2520EM Reference Design CC2520EM_REFDES Texas Instruments Reference Designs

Selection and Solution Guides

Selection Guides (3)

Title Abstract Type Size (KB) Date Views
PDF 9.09 MB 02 May 2013 3038
PDF 4.72 MB 02 May 2013 1364
PDF 11.49 MB 05 Aug 2010 965

Tools and Software

Name Part # Company Software/Tool Type
Code Composer Studio (CCS) Integrated Development Environment (IDE) CCSTUDIO Texas Instruments SW Development Tools, IDEs, Compilers

Product Bulletin & White Papers

White Papers (2)

Title Abstract Type Size (MB) Date Views
PDF 393 KB 27 Jun 2014 12454
PDF 98 KB 08 Apr 2013 852

News Releases & Authored Articles

Visit the News Center

Similar End-Equipment Solutions

TI End-Equipment

All TI End-Equipment Solutions

Support and Community

Wikis

Visit the TI Wiki

Training & events

Name Type Available During
TI's C553x DSPs - industry's lowest price and lowest power DSPs
TI's breakthrough price for DSPS extends sophisticated signal processing and ultra-low-power into new world of cost-sensitive apps
On-Line Training   On Demand  
Technical Overview of the Ultra-low power C5505
TI’s latest TMS320C5504/05 low-power DSPs provide energy efficieny and longer battery life for portable applications such as...
On-Line Training   On Demand  
Analog and Embedded Processing Solutions for Medical Applications

Customers can easily begin designing with TIs’ Medical Development Kit (MDK), based on the TMS320C5505 DSP.

On-Line Training   On Demand  
Sensor Signal Conditioning and Interface for Medical
Explore the various sensor interface techniques and solutions available for medical applications.
On-Line Training   On Demand  
Market Drivers and Technology Enablers for Wireless Connectivity in Medical
This session will explore low power wireless technologies including Zigbee, 802.15.4, WLAN, RFID.
On-Line Training   On Demand  

See more training & events

Other Support